carer

True Stories: Cecily Michaels – Value from being a volunteer!

As a person who has volunteered since my school days I find my position with TRI Community Exchange very rewarding as it is an incredible organisation to work for, under the inspirational guidance and direction of Jane Uff and my brilliant colleagues, who are all dedicated, talented and inspiring people. It is an honour to be a part of such a team.Cecily-Michaels_Tri-Community_edited

My role is to inspire people to volunteer for Home and Community Care (HACC) services for the frail aged and people with a disability, so they can remain in their homes. The other part of my role is to support these services in recruiting, training, managing and retaining volunteers.

TRI makes many worthy contributions to the sector through their affordable and competent computer and IT skills training, communityNet news, information and resource website for the community sector, and in its work with multicultural communities in the Nepean, Hawksbury and Blue Mountains regions.

I also volunteer as a Board Member of the Springwood Neighbourhood Centre Cooperative and also as a Project Manager for a prevention project in the occupied Palestinian Territories, against gender based violence, particularly targeting children and incest. I have just returned from a 3 week monitoring trip and am humbled by the incredible work this small partner organisation is undertaking with only volunteer staff.

True Stories: Beau Thornton – The challenge gives me a purpose to keep going!

Beau-ThorntonI began work in the disability and community care sector when I was 19. I started out by accident when a friend raised the idea. I was quite apprehensive at first, but what I loved about it straight away was the people. Back then, I could not have imagined the career opportunities that have come my way in the last few years.

Today I am an Accommodation Manager, running the Community Justice Program (CJP) for Sylvanvale, based in Kirrawee. The CJP is aimed at preventing people with disabilities who have broken the law from reoffending, and also assists people with disabilities who are homeless or living on streets.

True Stories: Emily Ninnes – There is no typical day!

Emily NinnesI’ve been working with people with a disability since I was 14. As a lot of adolescent girls do, I was babysitting for extra pocket money, in Armidale, where I grew up. One of the kids I was babysitting turned out to have a disability. When I was 14 and 9 months (thus officially able to work) I got registered as her respite carer.

Now, 13 years later, I am a Case Manager for the St Vincent de Paul Society’s Mary MacKillop Outreach.